As we’ve said time and time again, September is a powerful celestial month. Actually very soon we’re facing an occultation which is something worth watching and perhaps even feeling within. 

According to Earth Sky, the moon will be passing Mars around September 4-6th. This meaning we will be able to see the moon literally move past the red giant if we know where to look and depending on the scale you’d like to see have the right equipment. I am sure you know by now that without binoculars or a small telescope planets when visible appear similar to stars would on any other night. 

All of this having been said, knowing that this occultation is happening will help you spot the red planet more quickly, that’s for sure. The moon will be waning gibbous phase and Mars will be located close to Uranus in the sky. If you see the moon, looking near it will likely help you to find Mars with ease. 

Space.com wrote as follows on the celestial event:

Every once in a while, something will appear in the sky that will attract the attention of even those who normally don’t bother looking up. It’s likely to be that way in the late-night hours of Saturday night/early Sunday morning (Sept. 5-6) when the waning gibbous moon, 86% illuminated, will appear in very close proximity to the now-brilliant planet Mars

Every once in a while, something will appear in the sky that will attract the attention of even those who normally don’t bother looking up. It’s likely to be that way in the late-night hours of Saturday night/early Sunday morning (Sept. 5-6) when the waning gibbous moon, 86% illuminated, will appear in very close proximity to the now-brilliant planet Mars

Not a few of these calls excitedly inquire about “the mysterious UFO” that’s closely hovering in the vicinity of our natural satellite!

As a bonus, from the middle of South America and a narrow slice of western Africa, the moon will appear — for a short time — to hide or eclipse Mars from view during the predawn hours on Sunday morning. The actual term is called an occultation (Latin for “hiding”). An opportunity to see the moon occult a bright planet at night does not happen too often, so for those who are fortunate to live in the occultation zone, this upcoming event is one that really should not be missed.

Space.com also noted that on Saturday night the red planet itself will be roughly 44,243,000 miles from Earth and approaching quickly. Mars from now well into October might be putting on quite the show, honestly. Now, while things won’t be quite as great of sight here in North America but the event is still worth watching, that’s for sure.

If you like looking at the sky or spending time learning about the things in the celestial world, this event is one you won’t want to miss. Look up at the sky over the next few nights and really get to know the red planet a bit better. It truly is a sight to see.

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