We all have a sense of intuition. Now, for some, it is much more intense than it is for others but it is still always there.

Where does our intuition come from though? What is causing it to do the things it does? Digby Tantam, a Professor at the University of Sheffield, has gone to great lengths to research intuition and believes he has the answers we have all been looking for.

“The only real valuable thing is intuition.”- Albert Einstein

He published his findings in his book The Interbrain. He seems to think that our human brains are interconnected and are able to communicate with other brains. This being done non-verbally, of course. He claims it is occurring through micro-signals that are revealing the thoughts of others.

This essentially means he thinks that our brains speak to one another through a means similar to WI-FI. He calls this connection the Interbrain and argues that it is what creates our gut-feeling because our brain on a subconscious level already knows what those around us are thinking. Does that make sense to you?

Tantam told the Telegraph as follows on his new book:

“We can know directly about other people’s emotions and what they are paying attention to,”

“It is based on the direct connection between our brains and other people’s and between their brain and ours. I call this the interbrain.”

“The area of the brain that is closest to the nose os the orbitofrontal cortex. It might be there because so many of our most basic connections to other people are via smell.”

People with autism are in his theory not plugged into this like the rest of us and added:

“They are often able to pick up or learn what expressions mean and yet that doesn’t seem to solve the problem of that lack of human connection.”

“Emotional contagion occurs at the speed of light, not the speed of electronic transmission. Face-to-face visual input is accompanied by sound, by gesture, by the smell of sweat, by the possibility of touch, and by a connection.”

This is a highly controversial subject but I find these things to be quite fascinating. What do you think about all of this?

Featured image via The Epoch Times

 

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