Back in 2017, changes were made to the NIH (National Institutes of Health) webpage one of which really got the internet going. While NIDA wording things in this manner might not sound like much to everything it has shocked many.

In the revision made to the NIH marijuana webpage, its title went from ‘Is Marijuana Medicine?’ to ‘Marijuana As Medicine.’ Now, this revision was not something that had to be done which makes it even more interesting. While the article itself goes on to note that the FDA does not recognize marijuana as medicine it mentioned how significant the study of chemicals in marijuana have been.

This webpage in general touches on how the chemicals within the marijuana plant can help treat a range of illnesses and symptoms. It goes so far as to write quite in depth about how some studies have suggested that medical legalization could literally decrease prescription opioid use and overdose deaths as well as other things of the sort. That being said claims the reason as to why it is not legalized just yet in this manner is because of a ‘lack of evidence’ when it comes to confirming the benefits.

From there NIH wrote as follows on how cannabinoids could be useful as medicine:

Currently, the two main cannabinoids from the marijuana plant that are of medical interest are THC and CBD.

THC can increase appetite and reduce nausea. THC may also decrease pain, inflammation (swelling and redness), and muscle control problems. Unlike THC, CBD is a cannabinoid that doesn’t make people “high.” These drugs aren’t popular for recreational use because they aren’t intoxicating. It may be useful in reducing pain and inflammation, controlling epileptic seizures, and possibly even treating mental illness and addictions. Many researchers, including those funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), are continuing to explore the possible uses of THC, CBD, and other cannabinoids for medical treatment.

For instance, recent animal studies have shown that marijuana extracts may help kill certain cancer cells and reduce the size of others. Evidence from one cell culture study with rodents suggests that purified extracts from whole-plant marijuana can slow the growth of cancer cells from one of the most serious types of brain tumors. Research in mice showed that treatment with purified extracts of THC and CBD, when used with radiation, increased the cancer-killing effects of the radiation.

Scientists are also conducting preclinical and clinical trials with marijuana and its extracts to treat symptoms of illness and other conditions, such as:

Diseases that affect the immune system, including:

HIV/AIDS
multiple sclerosis (MS), which causes a gradual loss of muscle control
inflammation
pain
seizures
substance use disorders
mental disorders

Upon reading that I am sure you are on the same page we are. It sounds like the agency is quite aware of the usefulness of this amazing plant. NIDA recognizes the state approved medicinal use of marijuana and is aware that as time passes it seems more research will lead to wider spread legalization/more approved medications of the sort. While it is one small step, it is a small step in the right direction no matter how you look at it.

While most other agencies have kept their lips sealed on the topic and stuck to the narrative at hand this agency seems to be much more open. I am sure the organization did not think the change on their website would be taken in this manner but it has been and should be. How do you feel about all of this? Do you think it is as positive of a thing as everyone has made it out to be?

(Image Via: Pixabay)

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