25+ Maps That Will Make Your Reconsider Everything You Once Knew to Be True

By October 22, 2018 Science, World News

Growing up, and all through school, we relied heavily on the use of maps in order to better understand the world’s geography. In fact, most school children were required to study and learn the World Map at one time or another during their educational careers. What we didn’t realize is just how inaccurate the scale of that map truly is.

It’s not that there were significant mistakes made, or even that anyone was inaccurate in their calculations. The struggle, as it pertains to the World Map, comes down to the idea of taking the three-dimensional globe and plotting it out on a two-dimensional map. It’s a challenge that baffled many, however, Flemish cartographer and geographer Gerardus Mercator set to creating a working solution. Mercator wasn’t always a respected man in society, in fact, in 1544 he spent months in prison after the Inquisition revealed suspicions of heresy. On top of being a cartographer and geographer, Mercator also demonstrated an interest in mathematics, cosmography, history, theology, philosophy, terrestrial magnetism, and astronomy.

Mercator’s legacy, however, would be the creation of the Mercator World Map in 1569. With a focus on aiding exploration, Mercator ensure that the finished product would be accurate for navigational purposes, however, in order to accomplish this task, he would have to scale the various countries to slightly inaccurate sizes depending on their position relative to the equator. This would result in the countries closer to the equator being seen as smaller while the countries further away appear much larger in size.

In an effort to highlight this effect, the website thetruesize.com allows its users to compare the size of various countries by moving landmasses on the map to different locations, adjusting their size accordingly. Interested in discovering just how it worked, members of the Bored Panda team decided to test it out. The maps they created would call lead you to question everything you once believed to be true about the world.

This Is How It All Works:

Source: Bored Panda

Check out these incredibly interesting comparison maps:

#1 – Australia is often underestimated, but when placed over Europe, it nearly covers the whole continent.

Source: Bored Panda

#2 – Surprisingly, if California were moved to the UK they would be nearly the same size.

Source: Bored Panda

#3 – If Poland was taken and shifted into the Norwegian sea, it would be significantly larger.

Source: Bored Panda

#4 – Greenland is often believed to be gigantic, but when compared to the United States or Brazil, it’s not so big after all.

Source: Bored Panda

#5 – If China were placed over Russia, it would appear much larger than it is usually depicted.

Source: Bored Panda

#6 – By moving the United States either north or south, we can clearly see the differences on the map, as it would be comparable in size to Canada if moved up but would shrink dramatically if moved to the equator.

Source: Bored Panda

#7 – While it normally looks small, if Romania was moved into the Arctic Ocean as an island, it would be much larger.

Source: Bored Panda

#8 – The small country of Mexico would appear to be massive if moved up onto Greenland.

Source: Bored Panda

#9 – Often believed to be smaller in size, if Australia were moved to North America, it would be MUCH larger than we are used to seeing.

Source: Bored Panda

#10 – In its normal position Lithuania is tiny, but if moved north either into the Barents Sea or Arctic ocean it would be seen as significantly larger.

Source: Bored Panda

#11 – Brazil would be massive if it was part of Asia.

Source: Bored Panda

#12 – Moving the UK either north or south of its usual position really highlights its actual size in comparison to other countries around the globe.

Source: Bored Panda

#13 – The ‘tiny’ country of Japan would stretch across a significant portion of Canada if moved over to North America.

Source: Bored Panda

#14 – If the Democratic Republic of the Congo were to be moved north, its size would be comparable to that of Greenland.

Source: Bored Panda

#15 – Antarctica suddenly appears much smaller when it’s moved to the equator and compared to Brazil.

Source: Bored Panda

#16 – Russia isn’t nearly as big when it is moved onto the equator.

Source: Bored Panda

#17 – If Iceland were moved over to the United States, it could be compared quite accurately to the state of New York.

Source: Bored Panda

#18 – If India were moved up towards Russia, it would appear MUCH larger in size.

Source: Bored Panda

#19 – While Iceland is smaller than Greenland regardless of how you position it, moving it north onto Greenland makes it appear slightly larger.

Source: Bored Panda

#20 – If Indonesia were moved north, it would almost cover all of Russia.

Source: Bored Panda

#21 – Most Americans believe that Alaska is massive compared to the other states, but if we were to move it south next to the contiguous states it is significantly smaller in size.

Source: Bored Panda

#22 – While it’s often seen as the ‘great bear’ on the back of the United States, if Canada were moved down we would actually see the two as nearly the same size.

Source: Bored Panda

#23 – Russia is often seen as massive, but if it were moved down to Australia we can really see a difference in size.

Source: Bored Panda

#24 – The United States looks much smaller when it’s placed next to Australia.

Source: Bored Panda

#25 – If Texas were to be moved up on top of Alaska, it would actually be approximately the same size.

Source: Bored Panda

#26 – The continent of Europe would almost entirely fit within the borders of the United States if it was moved over to the same place on the map.

Source: Bored Panda

#27 – Canada, the ‘Great Giant’ of the north, isn’t nearly as big if it’s moved down to South America.

Source: Bored Panda

Feature Image Source: Bored Panda

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