DNA Results Show That Some Of the First Viking Warriors Were Women

By October 22, 2017 Science

What a better time in society for science to prove that women have previously been fearsome and strong Vikings! Women sure do face some challenges in the modern day society, but nothing like the women Vikings used to!

When you think of Vikings or powerful warriors you can’t help but envision a large bulky man! It’s the way history has taught us to think for decades, but science has yet again proven history to be wrong. According to the new findings discovered in a Viking age grave in Sweden, some of the first Vikings were actually women! The evidence found dates all the way back to the 10th century!

The researchers at Stockholm and Uppsala Universities published their discoveries based on the remains of a decorative female warrior in the American Journal of Anthropology. ‘This is the first formal and genetic confirmation of a female Viking warrior,’ said Professor Mattias Jakobsson at Uppsala University’s Department of Organismal Biology. While the bones were first dug up in the 1880’s, recent studies discovered morphological traits that suggested the skeleton was female and the grave contained a slew of items researchers thought was a male’s.

For all this time researchers thought that the bones belonged to a male Viking warrior, while all along it has been a woman! The gender of the skeleton was confirmed and published in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology. By analyzing the DNA collected from the skeletons left canine and left humerus, the researchers were able to confirm the individual had two X chromosomes and no Y chromosomes – proving that this was a woman.

‘The gaming set indicates that she was an officer, someone who worked with tactics and strategy and could lead troops in battle,’ said Charlotte Hedenstierna-Jonson, Stockholm University, who led the study.

‘What we have studied was not a Valkyrie from the sagas but a real-life military leader, that happens to have been a woman.’

The researchers additionally conducted an isotope analysis of the skeleton that showed evidence of a traveling lifestyle. The researchers believe she was part of the society that dominated northern Europe between the 8th and 10th centuries!

This is a revolutionary discovery for the role of women in history and it is extremely empowering! In a time where women are facing repeated oppression and inequality, this scientific discovery is an amazing encouragement for what women are capable of achieving!

Leave a Reply